Soaked (Installation)

Soaked is an ongoing project using black, unwanted, punk and hardcore shirts that have been grown out of literally or figuratively. These shirts are collected from friends and people in my community, as well as from my own closet. The shirts are then bound and soaked in my urine for several weeks or months to produce the transformation—a technique that references both the processes of photography and the heavy exchange of bodily fluids that occurs at punk shows. This installation was at The Ice Box in Philadelphia, PA in 2019. Click here to see the zine.

Discarded punk and hardcore shirts, bottles of artist's urine, bottles of urine after soaking in shirts, ziplock bags, rubber bands, latex gloves, Devil's Ivy, TV, DVD/VHS player, inkjet prints, zines
2019

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Ⓒ E. Aaron Ross 2020

Soaked (Zine)

***NOW AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE*** Soaked is an ongoing project using black, unwanted, punk and hardcore shirts that have been grown out of literally or figuratively. These shirts are collected from friends and people in my community, as well as from my own closet. The shirts are then bound and soaked in my urine for several weeks or months to produce the transformation—a technique that references both the processes of photography and the heavy exchange of bodily fluids that occurs at punk shows.

Each shirt featured is sized on the page according to its actual size, with a front view, bac view, and detail on the adjacent page. The collection so far has been archived into three separate zines. the following spreads are excerpts from all three. The models for this work are self-identified fans of punk and hardcore.

Found shirts, artist's urine, ziplock bags, rubber bands, models, zine
8" x 10"
2019

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Ⓒ E. Aaron Ross 2020

This Is My Body, Which is For You
This Is My Body, Which is For You
This Is My Body, Which is For You - phone photos
This Is My Body, Which is For You - end

This Is My Body, Which is For You

After the cake was revealed, I asked for help to place and light the candles. We then sang a song before collectively blowing them out. As one person pointed out, there was a significant exchange of bodily fluids in this process. I cut the cake and asked each person which piece they would like. The final image is what they chose not to eat.

Cake, frosting, edible image, trick candles
10" x 14"
2018

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Ⓒ E. Aaron Ross 2020

Approximating the Noise Floor

In the center of an otherwise dark room is an all white overhead projector on a black A.V. cart. An unknown number of blank transparencies sit on its glass surface, stacked until they hit the lens. Due to the noise floor of the medium of transparencies, they consume and contain the available light. By the time the stack hits the top, the lens is blocked and prevented from projecting forward. The floor becomes the ceiling. The mirror, which usually bounces the image outward, now only gazes back at the viewer blankly. Contact microphones, which are moved and manipulated during the performance, are attached to different parts of the body of the projector with sticky tack, which acts as both an adhesive and a conduit. The sound is sent through a looping pedal and mixer, which splits the signals between multiple speakers around the exterior of the space, pointing inward, back towards the center and source. The sound is all consuming in its volume and describes the space as it fills it. The system is self-contained and all encompassing.

In sonic terms, the noise floor is the unwanted sound produced by the medium itself and the accumulation of devices used for recording. It’s the hiss of a cassette, or a record, a microphone, a set of television speakers, and even the hum of the room you’re recording in. It’s what masks any sounds that fall below it, and something you must rise above for your signal to register. This piece is a physical and sonic manifestation of that phenomenon, expanded into 4 dimensions.

This video is an excerpt of a performance, but also documentation of the piece in its other form–as an autonomous installation sans-performer.

Overhead projector, A.V. cart, blank transparencies, sticky tack, contact microphones, looping pedal, mixer, speakers.
2018

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Ⓒ E. Aaron Ross 2020

Boys Like Me (Colorado, USA)

A short excerpt of an infinite loop. This video is one of three pieces made shortly after the school shooting in Parkland, Florida in February of 2018.

HD Video
2018

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Ⓒ E. Aaron Ross 2020

Untitled (With Mom)

This piece picks up with the remains of a piece called “Full Rise, Stay New” and is part of a duo including Untitled (With Sofia).

HD Video
2017

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Ⓒ E. Aaron Ross 2020

Unfurling Toxicity in a Degenerating Mind

The image used for this flag is a digital composite from a microscope of a slice of person’s brain with a degenerative brain disease, such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. This image was supplied courtesy of the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research, Bio-samples and Brain Bank.

Digitally printed polyester, flag, flagpole
3' x 5'
2017

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Ⓒ E. Aaron Ross 2020

Untitled (With Sofia)

This piece picks up with the remains of a piece called “The Greatest Adventure“, and is part of a duo, including Untitled (With Mom).

HD Video
TRT: 4:01
2017

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Ⓒ E. Aaron Ross 2020

I Was One of Them

This video is part of a group of work titled “Normalization of Deviance, To Touch the Face of God.” It is a mash up of the broadcasted Challenger launch and tragedy, and a broadcasted episode of the children’s show, Punky Brewster, called “Accidents Happen”, which was made the same year in response and designed to perform a kind of at-home-therapy. This video was exhibited in conjunction with a long exposure photo diptych of the two broadcasts, this text printed and stapled on seven standard pages, and a flag featuring a microscopic image of a slice of a human brain with a degenerative brain disease. The audio in this video played on separate speakers on the other side of the space, removed from the video.
HD video, audio, archival inkjet prints, document holder, stapled texts, flag, flagpole
2018

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Ⓒ E. Aaron Ross 2020

To Touch the Face of God

Accidents Happen, To Touch the Face of God

This diptych is part of a group of work titled “Normalization of Deviance, To Touch the Face of God.” It sourced from the broadcasted Challenger launch and tragedy, and a broadcasted episode of the children’s show, Punky Brewster, called “Accidents Happen”, which was made the same year in response and designed to perform a kind of at-home-therapy.

This diptych was exhibited in conjunction with an audio and video piece, a text piece, printed and stapled on seven standard pages, and a flag featuring a microscopic image of a slice of a human brain with a degenerative brain disease. The audio shown in the video played on separate speakers on the other side of the space, removed from the video and in the presence of these prints.

To Touch the Face of God [00:73] – (right)
A 73 second exposure of a tv screen playing the broadcasted flight of challenger.

Accidents Happen, Punky [24:21] – (left)
A 24 minute 21 second exposure of a tv screen playing an episode of the children’s show, Punky Brewster, made in the same year as the Challenger explosion. An episode in which the child actors of the show re-enacted the phenomenon of children around the country watching the challenger explosion happen in real time on a tv in their classrooms.

Archival Inkjet Prints
40" x 60" each
2018

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Ⓒ E. Aaron Ross 2020